Monthly Archives: September 2016

Mark Gresham on ArtsATL: September 2016

Collected links of reviews and articles of the month on ArtsATL.com:

In an unusual move, Robert Spano dances.

In an unusual move, Robert Spano dances.

13 SEP 2016 • Review: Spano and Stallings join forces to make joyful noise in “cloth{field}” [ArtsATL]
co-authored with Cynthia Bond Perry
photo by Thom Baker
Violinist Joshua Bell with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

Violinist Joshua Bell with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

19 SEP 2016 • Review: ASO rings in the new season with rousing evening of Tchaikovsky and Joshua Bell [ArtsATL]
 
photo by Jeff Roffman
Conductor Robert Spano and pianist Garrick Ohlsson

Conductor Robert Spano and pianist Garrick Ohlsson

23 SEP 2016Review: Pianist Garrick Ohlsson helps ASO kick off its new season with grand and bold fanfare [ArtsATL]
 
photo by Jeff Roffman
flutist Todd Skitch, violist Catherine Lynn and cellist Brad Ritchie

flutist Todd Skitch, violist Catherine Lynn and cellist Brad Ritchie

30 SEP 2016Review: The Atlanta Chamber Players premiere new piece by Rapido! champ Mark Buller [ArtsATL]
 
photo by Mark Gresham

Summit Piano Trio adeptly performs music by Beethoven and Arensky

by Mark Gresham | 20 SEP 2016

Summit Piano Trio

Summit Piano Trio   (credit: Mark Gresham)

KENNESAW, GA – On Monday evening the Summit Piano Trio (violinist Helen Hwaya Kim, cellist Charae Krueger and pianist Robert Henry) performed a concert of music by Beethoven and Arensky. The performance took place in Morgan Hall of the Bailey Performance Center on the campus of Kennesaw State University.

The program opened with a familiar work, Beethoven’s Piano Trio in B-flat major, Op. 97 – commonly known as the “Archduke Trio,” one of a total of 14 works the composer dedicated to Archduke Rudolph of Austria. I won’t elaborate further on the Trio itself, since often performed, except to say that for me it is largely an example of “happy, cheerful Beethoven,” and the Summit musicians brought to it a great deal of facility and sunshine in their performance.

By contrast, I was entirely unfamiliar with the other work on the program, the Piano Trio, Op. 32 of Russian composer Anton Arensky (1861–1906), despite the fact it has been recorded and released commercially no less than 18 times in this century alone. Still, Arensky is today not a household name though he has never entirely dropped off the classical music radar.

Arensky was a student of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Among his own students were Alexander Scriabin, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Alexander Gretchaninov. Yet fate placed Arensky in a netherworld of not quite obscurity but neither the brilliant sunlight of fame, essentially for a lack of originality rather than any lack of compositional skill, which was at its peak in his chamber music. Even his own teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov, said of him, “He will be soon forgotten.”

And yet no less than Igor Stravinsky, a Rimsky-Korsakov student of the next generation, spoke positively of the composer and his first piano Trio: “Arensky was friendly, interested, and helpful to me, … I always liked him and at least one of his works – the famous Piano Trio in D minor.” But Arensky placed his stylistic lot with mainstream European (Germanic) Romanticism rather than the Russian Nationalist school, following the lead of Tchaikovsky – which may have colored the opinion of Rimsky-Korsakov somewhat.

Despite lack of originality, this Piano Trio is a fine product of its era, and secures a foothold for Arensky in the history books as a composer. Its consistently energetic but lyrical opening movement contains traces of charming playfulness reminiscent of Mendelssohn. A blithesome Scherzo forms the second movement, followed by reflective, dreamy Elegia whose melancholic theme is introduced by muted cello. That mood is interrupted by the advent of the more emphatic Finale, which summarizes the Trio with references to what has gone before.

The musicians of the Summit Piano Trio again brought forth the music’s best qualities to the fore, concluding a enjoyable evening of music which engaged the listener and did not tire. $bull;

Fractured Atlas LogoThis post was made possible in part by funds from Fractured Atlas. Donations supporting the Fractured Atlas “Mark Gresham” project may be made online by clicking the linked logo on the right. Fractured Atlas is a 501(c)(3) public charity; all donations are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.

Sarah Chang and Julio Elizalde open Emory’s 2016-’17 Candler Series with music by Bartók, Brahms and Franck

by Mark Gresham | 12 SEP 2016

Violinist Sarah Chang

Violinist Sara Chang (credit: Colin Bell)

ATLANTA, GA – Violinist Sarah Chang and pianist Julio Elizalde opened Emory University’s esteemed Flora Glenn Candler Concert Series this past Saturday with a sold-out recital of music by Bartók, Brahms and Franck at the Schwartz Center for Performing Arts’ 825-seat Emerson Concert Hall.

Chang and Elizalde, who are beginning their fourth season of concert collaboration, began their performance with Béla Bartók’s Romanian Folk Dances, Sz. 56. They followed the Bartók with the Sonata No. 3 in D minor, op. 108, of Johannes Brahms. After intermission, the duo turned to the Sonata in A major, FWV 8, of Belgian-French composer César Franck.

Chang played the entire program of familiar violin repertoire from memory, often with great physical vigor and gyrations which seemed at great odds with the curiously small volume of sound she was drawing from her instrument in the acoustically generous Emerson Hall, When she did get loud, the sound was inexplicably metallic in character, especially on the upper strings. The opening of the second movement of the Brahms, on lower strings, was the most satisfying part of the first half, in that respect. Nevertheless, it was where fireworks occurred in the music that her fans in the audience were most thrilled.

That was especially true of the fast second movement of the Franck Sonata, were they could not help bursting into applause at its end, before Chang and Elizalde could move on to more original Recitative-Fantasia that serves as the third movement. The sonata’s finale, summing up the work with a powerful coda, gave the audience another ovation on the order of what they had, perhaps, launched prematurely in the middle of the piece. However, the duo’s rendering of Franck’s music was pinnacle of the evening, and due applause was warranted. ▪

Fractured Atlas LogoThis post was made possible in part by funds from Fractured Atlas. Donations supporting the Fractured Atlas “Mark Gresham” project may be made online by clicking the linked logo on the right. Fractured Atlas is a 501(c)(3) public charity; all donations are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.